When asked “What is the greatest proof of the existence of God?,” we may cite a verse of the Qur’an, a scientific argument, or a personal experience. But while it may not be apparent, the stories below should provide us with the most reassurance about the existence of God.

Mughirah ibn Shi‘bah, who would later become a Muslim, was once walking with Abu Jahl when, for the first time in his life, Mughirah met Prophet Muḥammad (saw). Prophet Muḥammad (saw) invited Abu Jahl to Islam, but Abu Jahl retorted, “I swear that even if I come to know that what you proclaim is correct, I will not follow you.” After Prophet Muḥammad (saw) left, Abu Jahl turned to Mughirah and said, “I know that he is telling the truth but when his ancestors, the children of Qusayy, said they are responsible for managing the Kiswa of the Kaaba, we accepted it. Then they said that they are responsible for managing the Majlis-e-Shura … [and then] the standard bearers of the flag of the Arabs … [and then] serving water to pilgrims … Now they have claimed that the prophet is from their tribe. I swear, I will never let this happen!” (Baihaqi).

On another occasion, Umayya bin Khalaf, another great enemy of Islam, was accompanying Hazrat Sa`d bin Mu`adh (ra), a close friend of Umayya’s, while Hazrat Sa’d (ra) was performing Umrah. At some point, Abu Jahl arrived and a dispute arose between him and Hazrat Sa’d (ra). Eventually, Umayya took Abu Jahl’s side, so Hazrat Sa’d (ra) said that Prophet Muhammad (saw) had prophesied that the Muslims would kill Umayya. Umayya was so struck with fear that he refused to leave Mecca. When Abu Jahl taunted him in travelling to Badr, Umayya’s wife reminded him of Prophet Muhammad’s (saw) prophecy. Umayya reasoned that he would not go near Prophet Muhammad (saw), but eventually fought and died at Badr (Bukhari).

These stories are interesting. Despite their opposition, no disbeliever ever accused Prophet Muhammad (saw) of lying. Indeed, because they could never assert Prophet Muhammad (saw) lied, the disbelievers resorted to claiming he was, God forbid, a “madman” (Qur’an 68:3). Accordingly, Hazrat Khalifatul Masih IV (rh) once said, “The prophets are the biggest proof (of the existence of God). No bigger proof than them can be imagined.” Huzur (rh) went onto explain that prior to their call to prophethood, no prophet was ever accused of lying and so it is inconceivable that such a person would utter the greatest lie possible – that God appointed him as His representative.

And so we, too, should fall in love with speaking the truth – especially in seemingly minor aspects of our lives. When some Sahabi said to Prophet Muhammad (saw), “you joke with us,” he replied, “But I only speak the truth” (Al Adab Al Mufrad); as an example, Prophet Muhammad (saw) once addressed Hazrat Anas bin Malik (ra) by saying,  يَا ذَا الأُذُنَيْنِ (“O you with the two ears!”) (Abu Daud). And when dealing with our children, the same applies, as Prophet Muhammad (saw) said, “Whoever invited a young child to give him something and did not do so, it would be counted as a lie” (Masnad Ahmad).

Thus, a spiritually fit Muslim cherishes truthfulness not only as a means to come closer to God, but so that they may become a living proof of the existence of God.

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